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Crossings

Crossing is a set of three publications that take the reader on a photographic, and informational journey from Melbourne Central Train Station, to the State Library of Victoria.

Goosebumps inspired.

Those creepy choose your own adventure books were the first thing I thought of when I was given the task to thoroughly document an area. The books allowed the readers to directly affect the narrative through their choices, and end in multiple ways.

There were five possible destinations I originally had in mind when I planned on creating my own choose your own adventure book. However, this proved an insurmountable task with the limited six week turnaround. In order to complete the publication and do justice to the brief I had to reduce the amount of locations. I narrowed it down to two iconic Melbourne landmarks; The State Library of Victoria, and Melbourne Central Train Station.

The contrast between both the buildings intrigued me. Two very different locations in feel, architecture, aesthetic, and purpose just metres from one another.

 

Interviewing.

Staying true to my original concept I still wanted journeys to be a core part of publication. They were to provide insight, historical information, and quirky facts about each place, with a focus on the visitors that populate these buildings.

Through documenting the spaces interviews and photos were mediums of choice. Between the two venues I conducted fifty interviews, and took over 1,000 photos of both locations and the journey between them. The interviews focused around the visitors personal journey that day. “Where have you been? Why are you visiting here today? Where are you off to next?” I had an array of interesting and surprising responses from students, retail workers, cranky husbands, and international visitors.

 

Print production.

The publication made sense to be a collection of three books. One book each for each destination, and a housing book that first provided the visual journey between each landmark, and secondly collated the books.

The housing booklet consists purely of photography. It is spiral bound and utilises a method of dos-à-dos binding that allows the publication to be read from either end of the book. The front cover is equipped with folds that hold the booklet dedicated to that location. If you start reading from the blue cover you begin your journey from a train platform at Melbourne Central. The red cover first situates you in the famous dome of the State Library. As you flick through the pages you are travelling to the other destination, through photographs.

Each location books includes a selection of interviews, photographs, historical documentation (e.g. floorplans), and facts. I imagined the collection of three books could be sold as a unique souvenir for visitors, and those with a historical fascination for Melbourne architecture.

Housing Booklet

42 pages, 2 inbuilt envelopes, spiral bound, and dos-á-dos layout.

Location Booklets

36 pages, and saddle stitched.

Printer

Printed and bound by Print Corner, Melbourne.

Crossings

Crossing is a set of three publications that take the reader on a photographic, and informational journey from Melbourne Central Train Station, to the State Library of Victoria.

Goosebumps inspired.

Those creepy choose your own adventure books were the first thing I thought of when I was given the task to thoroughly document an area. The books allowed the readers to directly affect the narrative through their choices, and end in multiple ways.

There were five possible destinations I originally had in mind when I planned on creating my own choose your own adventure book. However, this proved an insurmountable task with the limited six week turnaround. In order to complete the publication and do justice to the brief I had to reduce the amount of locations. I narrowed it down to two iconic Melbourne landmarks; The State Library of Victoria, and Melbourne Central Train Station.

The contrast between both the buildings intrigued me. Two very different locations in feel, architecture, aesthetic, and purpose just metres from one another.

 

Interviewing.

Staying true to my original concept I still wanted journeys to be a core part of publication. They were to provide insight, historical information, and quirky facts about each place, with a focus on the visitors that populate these buildings.

Through documenting the spaces interviews and photos were mediums of choice. Between the two venues I conducted fifty interviews, and took over 1,000 photos of both locations and the journey between them. The interviews focused around the visitors personal journey that day. “Where have you been? Why are you visiting here today? Where are you off to next?” I had an array of interesting and surprising responses from students, retail workers, cranky husbands, and international visitors.

 

Print production.

The publication made sense to be a collection of three books. One book each for each destination, and a housing book that first provided the visual journey between each landmark, and secondly collated the books.

The housing booklet consists purely of photography. It is spiral bound and utilises a method of dos-à-dos binding that allows the publication to be read from either end of the book. The front cover is equipped with folds that hold the booklet dedicated to that location. If you start reading from the blue cover you begin your journey from a train platform at Melbourne Central. The red cover first situates you in the famous dome of the State Library. As you flick through the pages you are travelling to the other destination, through photographs.

Each location books includes a selection of interviews, photographs, historical documentation (e.g. floorplans), and facts. I imagined the collection of three books could be sold as a unique souvenir for visitors, and those with a historical fascination for Melbourne architecture.

Housing Booklet

42 pages, 2 inbuilt envelopes, spiral bound, and dos-á-dos layout.

Location Booklets

36 pages, and saddle stitched.

Printer

Printed and bound by Print Corner, Melbourne.